Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Visual Treats in Dermatology
2023
:3;
142
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_184_2023

Burrowing bug (Cydnidae) pigmentation

Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
Corresponding author: Arun Somasundaram, Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. arunsomasundaram25@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Somasundaram A. Burrowing bug (Cydnidae) pigmentation. CosmoDerma 2023;3:142.

A 40-year-old male presented with complaints of sudden onset of asymptomatic skin lesions over the soles for 3 days, which could not be washed off with soap and water. The patient was an agricultural laborer by occupation and worked in fields outside. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple brownish macules of varying sizes over the soles [Figure 1a]. The rest of the cutaneous examination was unremarkable. Diagnosis of Cydnidae pigmentation was made based on the history. The patient was reassured regarding the same. The patient was followed up after a month, and the pigmentation disappeared spontaneously.

Figure 1:
(a) Multiple brownish macules of varying sizes over the sole. (b) Image of the burrowing bug.

Cutaneous pigmentation due to Cydnidae is underreported due to its transient nature. There are very few case reports reported in the literature. Cydnidae (burrow bugs – Chilocoris assmuthi [Figure 1b]) generally live in soil or sand and feed on roots or other underground parts of plants. They produce an odorous substance from special glands found in the thorax for self-defense. Pigmentation occurs due to this secretion rich in hydrocarbonate and when the insect is crushed.[1] Differential diagnosis includes acral lentigines, resolving petechiae, secondary syphilis, tinea nigra, and lentigines-associated syndromes. Dermoscopy would reveal a cluster of numerous bizarre-shaped shiny brown globules, clods, and granules with a superficial stuck-on appearance. Pigmentation fades off within a week spontaneously. The high prevalence of the bug in India, history of outdoor activity, and spontaneous pigmentation are clues to the diagnosis.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient consent is not required as the patient’s identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for manuscript preparation

The author confirms that there was no use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for assisting in the writing or editing of the manuscript, and no images were manipulated using AI.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , . Atypical cases of cydnidae pigmentation: Digging deeper through dermoscope. Indian J Paediatr Dermatol. 2021;22:356-9.
    [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
657

PDF downloads
63
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections