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Visual Treats in Dermatology
2023
:3;
30
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_24_2023

Mom under microscope

Department of Dermatovenereology, Velammal Medical College and Research Institute, Chinthamani, Madurai, India
Corresponding author: C. K. Sriram, Department of Dermatovenereology, Velammal Medical College and Research Institute, Chinthamani, Madurai, India. cksriram49@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Sriram CK, Shibani MI. Mom under microscope. CosmoDerma 2023;3:30.

A 17-year-old male presented to our outpatient department with nocturnal itching over genitals and webs spaces for the past 7 days. There was similar history in all his roommates. On examination, there were multiple excoriated papules seen in the genitals, inner aspect of both thighs, umbilicus, and web spaces. Scraping was done and a mature adult impregnated female mite, multiple eggs and scybala were demonstrated [Figure 1a and b]. A diagnosis of scabies was made. Scabies is one of the earliest diseases of humans caused by the itch mite, Sarcoptes scabiei var hominis, that burrows in the epidermis of the skin. The pregnant female mite lay 2–3 eggs per day. Human scabies mites are capable of surviving in the environment, outside of the human body, for 24–36 h in normal room conditions.[1] Patient was treated with 5% of permethrin overnight application on two occasions 1 week apart and proper instructions were given. Advised treatment for his roommates also.

Figure 1:: (a) Female impregnated mite with an egg inside. (b) Eggs of scabies mite with scybala (Under light microscopy).

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as there are no patients in this study.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , , . Survival and infectivity of Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis and var. hominis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1984;11:210-5.
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