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Visual Treats in Dermatology
2023
:3;
2
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_158_2022

Swelling on the neck with mucoid discharge

Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
Corresponding author: Arunachalam Narayanan, Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. narayanan359@gmail.com
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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Narayanan A. Swelling on the neck with mucoid discharge. CosmoDerma 2023;3:2.

A 2-year-old male child, born out of non-consanguineous marriage, presented to our clinic with a small, compressible, soft, and asymptomatic swelling [Figure 1] of size 2 × 2 cm over the right lateral aspect of the neck. The swelling had a central opening, leading to a blind ending in the deep neck tissue with history of occasional mucoid discharge. The lesion was present since birth. Ultrasound revealed a well-defined hypoechoic tract extending up to the superficial cervical fascia. Magnetic resonance imaging neck revealed a 13 mm hypointense sinus tract with a maximum width of 2.2 mm extending up to the level of the right sternocleidomastoid at the lower mid-third junction. Based on these findings, we made a diagnosis of branchial sinus. Branchial sinuses result from the maldevelopment of the branchial apparatus. They commonly arise from the second branchial arch. The treatment for branchial sinus is complete surgical removal under general anesthesia.[1]

Figure 1:: A small, compressible, soft, and asymptomatic swelling of size 2 × 2 cm over the right lateral aspect of the neck.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patients identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , , , . Branchial cyst with branchial fistula: A rare association. Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2019;71:633-6.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

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