Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Innovations
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Visual Treats in Dermatology
2024
:4;
61
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_29_2024

Skin-colored nodule on the forehead with telangiectasia

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

*Corresponding author: Pradeep S. Nair, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. dvmchtvm@yahoo.co.in

Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Nair PS. Skin-colored nodule on the forehead with telangiectasia. CosmoDerma. 2024;4:61. doi: 10.25259/CSDM_29_2024

A 68-year-old male presented with a nodule on the forehead of seven months’ duration. The lesion first started as a skin-colored papule, was tender, and attained the present size within a span of seven months. There was no history of ulceration. On examination, there was a well-defined skin-colored nodule of 2 × 2.5 cm on the forehead above the right eyebrow [Figure 1]. The surface showed telangiectasia, and the nodule was tender on palpation. There was no regional lymphadenopathy. Dermoscopy showed red areas with dilated blood vessels. An excision biopsy was done. Biopsy showed the dermis to be packed with tumor cells arranged in sheets and nests and tubular lumina filled with colloid material. High power showed two types of cells: Small cells with clear cytoplasm and tiny basophilic nuclei [Figure 2] and fusiform cells with basophilic cytoplasm [Figure 3], diagnostic of nodular hidradenoma (NH). The NA also known as clear cell hidradenoma is a benign tumor of eccrine differentiation. The tumor most commonly affects the head and neck region and is sometimes a painful tumor. The tumor cells express epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen. Malignant transformation is rare but can be aggressive. The NH is known for frequent recurrences; hence, wide excision is advocated.[1]

Well-defined skin colored nodule with telangiectasia on the forehead.
Figure 1:
Well-defined skin colored nodule with telangiectasia on the forehead.
Small cells with clear cytoplasm and tiny basophilic nuclei (white arrow) and tubular lumina filled with colloid material (black arrow), H&E ×400.
Figure 2:
Small cells with clear cytoplasm and tiny basophilic nuclei (white arrow) and tubular lumina filled with colloid material (black arrow), H&E ×400.
Fusiform cells with basophilic cytoplasm (arrow), H&E ×400.
Figure 3:
Fusiform cells with basophilic cytoplasm (arrow), H&E ×400.

Ethical approval

The Institutional Review Board approval is not required.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for manuscript preparation

The authors confirm that there was no use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for assisting in the writing or editing of the manuscript and no images were manipulated using AI.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , , , , , et al. An unsual presentation of a nodular hidradenoma. A case report and review of the literature. Ann Med Surg (Lond). 2021;61:61-3.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
8,944

PDF downloads
5,661
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections