Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Residents Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Brief Report
Case Report
Editorial
Focus
Images/Instrument in Dermatology/Dermatosurgery
Letter to the Editor
Living Legends
Looking back in history
Original Article
Perspective
Resident Forum
Residents Forum
Review Article
Spot the Diagnosis
Tropical Dermatology
Visual Treats in Dermatology
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Visual Treats in Dermatology
2022
:2;
67
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_69_2022

Piebaldism

Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
Corresponding author: Aravind Sivakumar, Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. aravinddermat@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Sivakumar A, Singh D. Piebaldism. CosmoDerma 2022;2:67.

An 18-month-old female child was brought with asymptomatic whitish patches over the forehead, chest, and upper and lower extremities since birth. There was history of spontaneous appearing normal areas of skin within the whitish patches; there was no family history of similar complaints. Examination revealed presence of multiple depigmented macules symmetrically over the knees, elbows, chest, and white forelock over the forehead [Figure 1]. There were multiple normal skin islands within these depigmented macules with leucotrichia of scalp, eyebrow, and eyelash poliosis. Eye and ear evaluation was within normal limits.

Figure 1:: Multiple symmetrical depigmented macules with areas of normal skin islands within over the knees, elbows, and chest with white forelock.

Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant condition due to defective melanoblast migration and differentiation with mutation in C-kit gene. Morphologically characterized by the presence of symmetrical areas of depigmented macules with areas of normal or hyperpigmented skin that arises spontaneously within the lesions. White forelock characterized by diamond shaped depigmented macule of forehead with corresponding leucotrichia can be seen. Syndromic conditions of piebaldism need to be ruled out such as Waardenburg’s syndrome characterized by heterochromia irides, dystopia canthorum, and sensorineural hearing loss in addition to these features.[1]

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

  1. , . Piebaldism: A brief report and review of the literature. Indian Dermatol Online J. 2012;3:144-7.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
1,237

PDF downloads
0
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections