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Innovations
2022
:2;
99
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_114_2022

A simple technique for procuring atraumatic forceps and mosquito hemostat

Mukhtar Skin Centre, Katihar Medical College Road, Katihar, Bihar, India
Corresponding author: Muhammed Mukhtar, Katihar Medical College Road, Katihar - 854105, Bihar, India. drmmukhtar20@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Mukhtar M. A simple technique for procuring atraumatic forceps and mosquito hemostat. CosmoDerma 2022;2:99.

PROBLEM

Incision and extraction are used to treat a variety of skin conditions, including molluscum contagiosum, calcinosis cutis, and senile comedones. However, manual extraction with fingers for evacuation of the contents after incision looks to be a messy affair. Extraction on soft skin tissue with metallic dissecting forceps might cause skin injury.[1-3] Dissecting forceps intubated with a ball pen refill polytube[4] have been used for extraction of comedones which may not be effective for calcinosis cutis on the scrotum. Furthermore, due to the cylindrical shape and tiny diameter of the refill polytube, it does not fit in the tips of a dissecting forceps and mosquito hemostat.

SOLUTION

Atraumatic forceps are the solution to the delicate tissue injury produced during extraction. We used a disposable micropipette to procure the forceps. The hub of the tip, that is, the proximal end of the micropipette tip, is cut off and discarded. The tube is placed over the hemostat tips from the cut end. The extra length of the tube is trimmed off. The remaining polytube tip is used to intubate the dissecting or Jeweler’s forceps [Figure 1a and b, Video 1]. Following that, the atraumatic incision and extraction of the aforementioned lesions can be performed using these intubated hemostats and forceps [Figure 2a-d]. As a result, this easily accessible atraumatic instrument is useful for removing lesions from delicate and loose skin without causing tissue damage or ecchymosis. However, extracting a very tiny size on tense skin or extremely huge lesions might be challenging. Large or flat forceps can be intubated with rubber tubes and finger gloves to help in the extraction of bigger lesions.

Video-1:Video-1:

Video-1:Procuring atraumatic forceps and hemostats with the use of a disposable micropipette tips.
Figure 1:: (a and b) Micropipette tip is used to procure atraumatic mosquito hemostat and dissecting forceps.
Figure 2:: (a-d) Molluscum contagiosum on the thigh (a), is being enucleated with atraumatic forceps (b), the enucleated or extracted pearly white molluscum content on the forceps (c), and the lesion after enucleation of molluscum body (d) a molluscum contagiosum content is extracted atraumatically using intubated forceps.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patients identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Videos available online at:

https://doi.org/10.25259/CSDM_114_2022

References

  1. , , . More efficacious extraction of molluscum bodies with angled forceps. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020;83:e79-80.
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  2. , , . A new method for removal of eyelid margin molluscum. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;78:e151-2.
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  3. , , . Use of a disposable ear speculum: An alternative technique for molluscum contagiosum curettage. Pediatr Dermatol. 2018;35:418-9.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  4. . Surgical pearl: Dissecting forceps with polytube for periorbital senile comedone extraction. J Skin Stem Cell. 2020;7:e104632.
    [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

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