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Innovations
2023
:3;
15
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_177_2022

Topical use of a saturated solution of sodium chloride salt for hemostasis for minor dermatosurgical procedure

Department of Dermatology, Mukhtar Skin Centre, Katihar, Bihar, India
Corresponding author: Muhammed Mukhtar, Department of Dermatology, Mukhtar Skin Centre, KMCH Road, Katihar 854105, Bihar, India. drmmukhtar20@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Mukhtar M. Topical use of a saturated solution of sodium chloride salt for hemostasis for minor dermatosurgical procedure. CosmoDerma 2023;3:15.

PROBLEM

Hemostasis plays a critical and major role in all dermatosurgical procedures.[1] However, during procedure, bleeding makes the site messy, hinders proper visualization of the site, and makes the procedure time consuming. For proper hemostasis, aluminum chloride, oxidized cellulose, silver nitrate, and porcine gelatins. Microfibrillary collagen, fibrin, thrombin, hemocoagulase, etc., are also used.[2] Moreover, the availability, local irritation, and cost of these are major concerns, leading to their limited use.

SOLUTION

We tried to overcome the problem using table salt sodium chloride (NaCl) in a novel way as cost-effective, readily available hemostatic gent. It works as a sclerosing and osmotic agent that makes the bleeding site hemostatic and dry. To get saturated solution of table salt (NaCl), it is dissolved in distilled water in a 1:2 w/v ratio, and this solution is kept and used as a hemostatic agent. During a small superficial routine dermatological procedure, the solution is applied at the bleeding site with a cotton bud [Video 1]. In this way, multiple lesions can be cut or curetted in a single sitting without delay and difficulty [Figure 1a-c]. The lesions heal in 7–10 days without significant side effects. There is no complaint of secondary bacterial growth at the treated site.

Video 1:

Video 1:The hemostatic agent is being applied on the curetted multiple dermatosis papulosa nigra.
Figure 1:: (a-c) The curettage of a seborrheic keratosis with better hemostasis.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patient’s identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Videos available online at

https://doi.org/10.25259/CSDM_177_2022

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , . Topical hemostatic agents in surgery: Review and prospects. Rev Col Bras Cir. 2018;45:e1900.
    [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  2. , , , . Topical hemocoagulase: A novel method of achieving hemostasis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020;85:e81-2.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

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