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Visual Treats in Dermatology
2023
:3;
42
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_161_2022

Red scrotum syndrome

Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
Corresponding author: Arunachalam Narayanan, Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. narayanan359@gmail.com
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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Narayanan A. Red scrotum syndrome. CosmoDerma 2023;3:42.

A 20-year-old male presented to our clinic with scrotal and penile erythema [Figure 1] without scaling accompanied by burning sensation and pruritus since the past 2 weeks. He had applied topical clobetasol propionate 0.05% over the scrotum for the past 4 months for his scrotal pruritus and burning sensation. Based on the history and examination findings, we made a diagnosis of red scrotum syndrome. Topical corticosteroids have radically changed dermatology practice since the late 1950s. However, easy access to these drugs in countries like India leads to their misuse and abuse, resulting in red scrotum syndrome. The increased rate of topical absorption over the scrotum also plays a role in the development of red scrotum syndrome.[1] Physicians should be aware of this entity to make a prompt diagnosis. While no standardized treatment is available, variable response is seen with amitriptyline, doxycycline, pregabalin, gabapentin, and carvedilol.

Figure 1:
Scrotal and penile erythema without scaling accompanied by burning sensation and pruritus.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patient’s identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , . Red scrotum syndrome: An update on clinicopathologic features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2022;87:614-22.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

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