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Visual Treats in Dermatology
2022
:2;
46
doi:
10.25259/CSDM_50_2022

Benign migratory glossitis

Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
Corresponding author: Arunachalam Narayanan, Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. narayanan359@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Narayanan A, Thappa DM. Benign migratory glossitis. CosmoDerma 2022;2:46.

A 30-year-old man presented to our clinic with asymptomatic, well-demarcated areas of atrophy and erythema over the tongue surrounded by whitish, serpiginous borders. The lesions began as small patches and gradually increased in size. The patient didn’t notice any change in the shape or size of the lesion. The patient didn’t have any comorbidities or signs of nutritional deficiency. On oral examination, multiple, flat, well-defined, map-like, erythematous areas of atrophy with scalloped whitish margin were seen over the dorsum [Figure 1a] and lateral borders [Figure 1b] of the tongue. A diagnosis of benign migratory glossitis was made based on the clinical history and examination findings. Geographic tongue or benign migratory glossitis affects 1-3% of the population. It is a benign entity caused due to atrophy of filiform papillae.[1] Though the condition is usually asymptomatic, few patients may experience sensitivity to spicy food. The incidence of geographic tongue is increased in patients with psoriasis, atopy, and fissured tongue. The condition doesn’t require any treatment.

Figure 1:: Multiple, flat, well-defined, map-like, erythematous areas of atrophy with a scalloped whitish margin over the (a) dorsum and (b) lateral borders of the tongue.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patients identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflict of interest

Author Devinder Mohan Thappa is the Editor-In-Chief of the journal.

References

  1. , , , . Geographic tongue: What a dermatologist should know. Actas Dermosifiliogr (Engl Ed). 2019;110:341-6.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

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